A Course in Forgiveness by Gerald Crawford

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Author: Forgiveness Support (page 1 of 11)

Identifying Your Core Values

Your Personal values are the general expression of what is most important for you. A value expresses the worth of something, and in this case what you categorical like and dislike.

So they are like categories for all your preferences in life. Values are formed starting in early childhood and are later consciously re-evaluated and can therefore be changed.

By comparing two values you can discover which is representing something that is more important than the other. Therefore you rate the one value over the other.

Personal values are generally operating in the background. They influence everything what you do but usually it happens on auto-pilot. You just know intuitively what you like and dislike and decide accordingly.

Why is it Good to Know Your Personal Values?

The answer is twofold:

First you get clarity and build your self-awareness by identifying your values and secondly knowing your highest values can act like a guide for you. It makes intelligent decisions easier. Also knowing your negative values, those from which you try to keep away from, is very helpful as well. When you are clearly aware of your value hierarchy you can consciously check situations against your value-system, which will create better decisions and results. It will be easier to keep your balance in life.

For instance when you are about to make an important decision you can double-check if going the one or the other way would go against one of your core values. On the long run, that would pose a problem for you.

So all in all it’s an awareness building process which can give you direction in life.

When choosing your personal core values it is important to think about the criteria that you will use to make your selection. Since your personal values decision will have multiple answers, your criteria will also help you to prioritize and limit your list. Using our decision making model, you will want to look at other connected decisions for goals/source requirements that will influence your criteria. If you have already made decisions for a personal vision, mission statement, and/or core beliefs, you should see goals/source requirements that will influence the criteria for this decision.

With your connected decisions in mind, here are some criteria that might help in selecting your personal core values.

  • Consistent with my personal vision, mission, and core beliefs – In addition to specific goals/source requirements, you can use this criteria as a way to eliminate personal values that are inconsistent with your other decisions.
  • Inspirational – Personal values should encourage you to fulfill your purpose in life. Great personal values, read every day, will provide an uplift and motivation to take on the day’s challenges.
  • Unique – Your values need to speak to you. Don’t hesitate to use values learned from others, but your core values should help define who you are and want to be. They should reflect the priorities for your life and will tend to emphasize your strengths while compensating for your weaknesses.
  • Provides guidance – Personal core values should help you in your everyday decisions, particularly with relationships.
  • Long lasting – This is about creating your future. Expect that your values will evolve as you grow, mature and gain life experience. However, this is not about following the latest fad. If you expect a personal core value to change next week, it likely isn’t very core.
  • Meaningful and rewarding – Values provide the measures that help us live meaningful lives that fulfill our given purpose. Living a life of meaning brings us joy.

A List of Core Values

There are a lot of value lists out there, so here are just the real core values that most people have and that differentiate a character the most. I tried to keep the list tight and avoid repetition by synonyms:

Abundance Accountability Achievement Action
Adventure Ambition Awareness Balance
Beauty Being the Best Calmness Cheerfulness
Clarity Comfort Compassion Competition
Connection Contribution Control Courage
Creativity Curiosity Determination Discipline
Effectiveness Empathy Energy Enthusiasm
Excellence Fairness Faith Fame
Family Flexibility Freedom Friendship
Fulfillment Fun Harmony Happiness
Health Honesty Honor Humility
Independence Integrity Intelligence Intimacy
Inspiration Kindness Knowledge Liveliness
Love Money Nature Passion
Peace Perfection Persistence Philanthropy
Power Respect Security Simplicity
Significance Spirituality Spontaneity Strength
Stability Success Status Teamwork
Tolerance Tradition Truth Vitality
Wealth Wisdom

Create Your Value Hierarchy

In order to create your 10 top-values do the following:

  1. Select the 10 values from the list above that you like most. (of course you can also do a Top 5 or Top 3)
  2. Start with the first in the list. Then order this by importance by comparing two values by asking: “Which one is more important to me if I had could only have one and had to compromise the second?” Remove the winner and write it on top of a new list and then continue with the remaining 6 on the old list and so on.
  3. Do this for all 10 until you have an ordered list of your top 10 values.

Here are my top 10 personal values:

  1. Truth
  2. Integrity
  3. Contribution
  4. Love
  5. Inspiration
  6. Family
  7. Fulfillment
  8. Health
  9. Creativity
  10. Success

Your value hierarchy expresses your character of course. Someone who values adventure highly is a different character as someone who values stability more. Someone who values success highly is different than someone who values family on top.

An interesting exercise is also to create your top 10 negative values, which express what you really dislike or what is totally unimportant to you.

Are Values Fixed or Can I Change Them?

By there very nature, your value-system tend to be more stable, it is your character in it’s many facettes. But single values are not static and fixed. They can change. Personal values usually change when something big happens, or when you are consciously re-evaluating your life and make a decision, based on your experiences, to change your value hierarchy.

As an example I valued diversity a lot in my first business. Later I learned by experience all the drawbacks of doing a lot at a time and now I value simplicity more.

So what when you are dissatisfied with a value you have and what to change it?

For instance you may have the top value of stability and you want to become a bit more flexible in your life. (could be the other way around as well) Changing this would work if you create experiences and enjoy them that are in alignment with the new value: flexibility in this example.

So to integrate a new value into your top-values:

  1. Create positive experiences that express this value in your life
  2. Decrease experiences that are aligned with the opposite value in your life
  3. Also working on your beliefs will make it easier to adapt to new values.

Please break your list down to TOP 5 and then to TOP 3 personal values.

What are your TOP 3 personal values?

This is my TOP 3 personal values:

  1. Integrity
  2. Truth
  3. Love

No person likes making mistakes. Having well defined personal core values helps us avoid making choices that work against who we want to be. Our values become a clear set of guidelines for our words and actions, consistently moving us in the direction aligned with our core beliefs and personal vision. Our life becomes one of our choosing, not one that is directed by the decisions of others. Our values help us build and maintain our identity as unique individuals.

Choosing and knowing your values can provide a number of benefits that include:

  • Reducing stress
  • Making better decisions
  • Finding environments and people that support your aspirations
  • Increasing joy and happiness
  • Supporting your growth and development
  • Helping in times of conflict or confusion
  • Growing contribution and value
  • Providing motivation

Knowing it or not, choosing it or not, all of us have a set of personal core values. Prevent discontent, conflict, frustration and lack of fulfillment by choosing consciously the values by which you want to live.


Now do the limpness test: Ask yourself the four following questions?

  1. Would you sacrifice any of theses vales for a million rand?
  2. Have you lost any of theses core values in times of stress?
  3. In 20 years would theses values still hold true?
  4. Are you prepare to disregard one or more of theses values if they put you at a disadvantage?

Aligning with your core values all the time makes you powerful.

Ref:. www.myrkothum.com/personal-values/

and www.decision-making-solutions.com/personal_core_values.html

What it Means to be Vulnerable?

Essentially what it all comes down to is whether they stick around when they see the worst of you. If they’re still there, you know you’re good.

Vulnerability means you fall easily. You see the best in people. You love them over the little things – the way their smile tilts and the intensity of their stare. You get attached easily, because you give yourself the freedom to feel.

Vulnerability means you’re comfortable opening up to other people. You’re willing to look someone in the eyes and spill your soul. You want others to know the authentic you instead of forcing a fake smile every time you enter the public eye.

Vulnerability means your mood can change in an instant. Seeing one sentence on social media can cause your heart to drop. It can ruin your entire day. Make you re-think everything you thought you knew about a person.

Vulnerability means you care deeply about things. You don’t want to lose what you have, because you love what you have. You love your life – or at least certain pieces of it. And you aren’t willing to loosen your grasp on them.

Vulnerability means that you’re willing to jump headfirst into love. You’re willing to give someone half your heart. To give them the power to destroy you or rebuild you.

Vulnerability means you’re comfortable crying over the things that upset you instead of pushing away all of your emotions. You’re the type of person that grabs a tissue and lets the tears fall instead of replacing your sadness with anger. You admit when you’re upset instead of trying to put on an act and appear strong when you’re secretly crumbling.

Vulnerability means you have nothing to hide. The people closest to you know about your dreams, your hopes, your fears. They know who you really are. You’ve given them permission to dig deep inside of yourself.

Vulnerability means you have a clear understanding of who you are as a person. You realize you’re not indestructible. You’re not superhuman. You’re mortal and full of flaws – but you’re still beautiful.

Vulnerability means having love for people you’ve never met. Realizing that you’re in communion with strangers across the globe. That you’re all connected because you share common thoughts and beliefs. That you’re not so alone after all.

Vulnerability means you have doubts. You think so highly of other people, of your friends and coworkers and parents, that you can’t stop yourself from comparing. It doesn’t mean you hate yourself – but it does mean that you see places where you can make improvements and try your hardest to do so.

Vulnerability means you admit when you’re wrong. You don’t pretend to know everything. You realize that you have a lot left to learn, and that there are so many people out there that can teach you more about the universe.

Vulnerability means having a huge heart. Caring about others. Wanting what’s best for the world.

Vulnerability means you’re human – so don’t you ever feel bad about shedding a single tear. About admitting that no, you’re not fine. About letting the truth out instead of spreading pretty lies.

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